Cancer Smelling Dogs Print E-mail
Written by Elizabeth Cohen and John Bonifield | CNN   
Wednesday, 25 November 2015 17:39

...For the next seven years, Lucy <a cross between a Labrador Retriever and an Irish Water Spaniel> learned to sniff out bladder, kidney and prostate cancer, and was even used in a study. Over the years, she has been able to detect cancer correctly more than 95% of the time. That's better than some lab tests used to diagnose cancer.

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Last Updated on Wednesday, 25 November 2015 17:43
T'was the night before the First Tuesday after the First Monday in March, and all through the House (and the Senate...) Print E-mail
Written by Dave Davidson | Florida Healthcare Law Firm Blog   
Thursday, 19 November 2015 00:00

It's that time of year. People are scrambling around, deciding what they want to give and what they want to get. Brand new packages are being wrapped up and filed away. Excitement and tension fill the air. Everyone can't wait for the big day; but in this season that big day doesn't happen until the first Tuesday after the first Monday in March. But it's never too early to start getting ready, right? In fact, the Florida Legislature is currently in session, drafting and filing bills that the sponsors hope will be considered in March and will become law in 2016. And as usual, health care is on a lot of legislative wish lists. Although all of these bills are subject to significant revision, and some may never make it out of a subcommittee, here's a sneak peek of some of the proposed health care legislation (without editorial - for now)...

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Last Updated on Friday, 20 November 2015 07:30
The FDA's Epic Regulatory Failure Print E-mail
Written by Brian Klepper, PhD | KevinMD   
Friday, 13 November 2015 16:41

A new study in JAMA Internal Medicine finds that two-thirds of cancer drugs considered by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) over the past five years were approved without evidence that they improve health outcomes or length of life. (This study closely corroborates and acknowledges the findings published last year by John Fauber of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and Elbert Chu of MedPage Today.)
Follow-up studies showed that 86 percent of the drugs approved with surrogate endpoints (or measures) and more than half (57 percent) of the cancer drugs approved by the FDA "have unknown effects on overall survival or fail to show gains in survival." In other words, the authors write, "most cancer drug approvals have not been shown to, or do not, improve clinically relevant end points."

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Last Updated on Friday, 13 November 2015 16:42
Sponsor Showcase Print E-mail
Written by Sponsor   
Wednesday, 25 November 2015 00:00
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Last Updated on Wednesday, 25 November 2015 17:38

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