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The Pentagon Wants to Weaponize the Human Brain Print E-mail
Written by FHI's Week in Review   
Monday, 15 October 2018 10:55
 
On Thursday, 10/11/18, The Atlantic posted a fascinating feature article from their print issue coming out next month. A former University of Miami associate professor of biomedical engineering and neuroscience, who now works for the government (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Pentagon's R&D department), is quoted in the article:

"I would claim to you that these tools <computers and smart phones> are not so smart. And maybe one of the reasons why they're not so smart is because they're not connected to our brains. Maybe if we could hook those devices into our brains, they could have some idea of what our goals are, what our intent is, and what our frustration is."
 
Read more in the current issue of Week in Review>> https://conta.cc/2yEkRjU
 
Last Updated on Monday, 15 October 2018 11:08
 
Physicians' regulatory burden worse than ever despite federal efforts Print E-mail
Written by FHI's Week in Review   
Monday, 08 October 2018 13:19
 
Virgil Dickson reports for Modern Healthcare on 10.4.18:

The CMS has prided itself in recent months on cutting and scaling back providers' regulatory burden, but those efforts have fallen short, according to a new survey by the Medical Group Management Association. An overwhelming majority, or 86%, of respondents reported the overall regulatory burden on their medical practice has increased over the past 12 months.

Read more in the current issue of Week in Review>> https://conta.cc/2E9Jafp
 
Last Updated on Monday, 08 October 2018 13:34
 
Studies in Healthy Older People Aim To Prevent Alzheimer's Print E-mail
Written by Marilynn Marchione | AP   
Tuesday, 02 October 2018 12:16
 
It may be too late to stop Alzheimer's in people who already have some mental decline. But what if a treatment could target the very earliest brain changes while memory and thinking skills are still intact, in hope of preventing the disease? Two big studies are going all out to try. Clinics throughout the United States and some other countries are signing up participants - the only studies of this type enrolling healthy older people.
 
"The excitement in the Alzheimer's field right now is prevention," said Dr. Eric Reiman, executive director of the Banner Alzheimer's Institute in Phoenix, which is leading the work.
 
Science so far has failed to find a drug that can alter the progression of Alzheimer's, the most common form of dementia; 146 attempts have failed over the last decade, a recent industry report found. Even drugs that help remove the sticky plaques that clog the brains of people with the disease have not yet proved able to stave off mental decline. It may be that they were tried too late, like lowering cholesterol after someone has suffered a heart attack whose damage can't be undone, according to Dr. Reiman.
 
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Last Updated on Tuesday, 02 October 2018 12:21
 
These Are the Economies With the Most (and Least) Efficient Health Care Print E-mail
Written by FHI's Week in Review   
Monday, 24 September 2018 17:36
 
Bloomberg published its annual global health analysis on September 19. As usual, it's depressing news for Americans. According to authors Lee J. Miller and Wei Lui:

The U.S. will cost you the most for treatment, both in absolute terms and relative to average incomes, while life expectancy of Americans -- about 79 years -- was exceeded by more than 25 countries and territories, according to an annual Bloomberg analysis in almost 200 economies.
 
Read more in the current issue of Week in Review>>
 
Last Updated on Monday, 24 September 2018 17:41
 
Sponsor Showcase Print E-mail
Written by Sponsor   
Tuesday, 16 October 2018 00:00
 
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Last Updated on Tuesday, 16 October 2018 17:14
 


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