Whistleblower Doctor Warns About Hospitals Hiring Physicians Print E-mail
Written by KHN   
Friday, 09 October 2015 16:29
khn logo black
There is a good chance that your once-independent doctor is now employed by a hospital. Michael Reilly, MD, a Fort Lauderdale, Fla., orthopedic surgeon, does not believe this is good for physicians, patients, or society.

For years he watched Broward Health, a nonprofit Florida hospital system, hire community doctors, pay them millions, and minutely track the revenue they generated from admissions, procedures, and tests.

Read More>>

Last Updated on Friday, 09 October 2015 16:33
The Legend of the Avoidable Hospital Readmission Print E-mail
Written by FHI's Week in Review   
Tuesday, 06 October 2015 16:03

A Country Doctor Writes in a 10.3.15 post:
A long, long time ago, hospitals existed to admit patients when they were sick, treat them with medicines or surgery and good nursing care, and discharge them after they became well.
Hospital care was at one time a charity, which evolved into a nonprofit service, before it became a Very Big Business...
...Medicare is now forcing the hospitals to spend more money than they receive during each such hospitalization, and, through the penalties, Medicare is giving itself a rebate every time one of these chronically ill patients gets readmitted appropriately, weeks after any shortcomings in the initial care would have been compensated for by the follow-up care or the passage of time.
Read more in the current issue of Week in Review>>
Huge Stark Law Hospital Settlements and Physician Culpability - The New Normal Post- Tuomey? Print E-mail
Written by   
Thursday, 01 October 2015 00:00

After the federal government's victory against Tuomey Hospital, we have seen an increasing number of large False Claims Act (FCA) settlements with hospitals involving Stark Law allegations. Relators are even citing, as evidence of ongoing recklessness, that hospital executives have been e-mailing articles about the Tuomey case to their staff. Given the Stark Law's intricate requirements, it is unsurprising that many hospitals are presented with Stark Law compliance questions. However, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) has not shown much leniency in its treatment of these cases, as shown by two recent settlements.
First, there is the settlement with Columbus Regional Healthcare System (Columbus) and Dr. Andrew Pippas to resolve two separate qui tams filed by a former Columbus executive, Richard Barker, in the Middle District of Georgia. Mr. Barker alleged both billing and Stark Law misconduct in his complaints. While the first complaint largely focused on allegations of improper evaluation and management upcoding and intensity-modulated radiation therapy billing, it also included some cursory allegations of improper physician financial relationships. The government declined to intervene in this case in 2013. In 2014, Mr. Barker filed a second qui tam alleging compensation to Dr. Pippas in excess of fair market value, determined in a manner that took into account the volume or value of his referrals, and paid pursuant to an employment agreement that would not have been commercially reasonable but for Dr. Pippas' referrals to Columbus. On September 4, Columbus entered into a FCA settlement to pay up to $35 million to resolve both cases.
The Columbus settlement contains several noteworthy characteristics...

Sponsor Showcase Print E-mail
Written by Sponsor   
Friday, 25 September 2015 00:00
gsk fhi 285x237 2015
Last Updated on Friday, 25 September 2015 19:11

Website design, development, and hosting provided by