Letting go when people let go of their lives Print
Written by John Dodson, MD | KevinMD   
Tuesday, 05 November 2019 18:46

My 83-year-old patient had outlived peoples' expectations on several occasions. Faced with a critical illness three years ago, she underwent emergency surgery and spent several months in the hospital with a series of complications, including septic shock, renal failure, and hospital-acquired pneumonia. I'd seen her in the office for a new visit soon after she was discharged. It took nearly 20 minutes to go through her history before walking into the exam room. Notes from several doctors during that hospitalization said that she might never become well enough to be discharged home. When I finally walked into the room, I expected to see someone frail, debilitated, with a caregiver answering most of my inquiries. Instead, she appeared robust, completely alert, and cheerfully answered my questions herself. "You look better than your chart," I told her, truthfully. Given the extent of her recent workup, we agreed to keep further testing and medication changes to a minimum. I established that we'd touch base in the office every three to four months - a typical interval at her age.

Last Updated on Friday, 20 December 2019 17:39